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Research

This category contains 23 posts

Laughter Yoga And Type 2 Diabetes

Laughter Yoga has many researched benefits. Here is a scientific study showing how laughter – and in this case they used Laughter Yoga – can help reduce glucose levels in those with type 2 diabetes.   THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF LAUGHTER YOGA ON THE INCREASE IN POSTPRANDIAL BLOOD GLUCOSE IN TYPE 2 DIABETIC PATIENTS “CONCLUSION … Continue reading

How Laughter Can Help People With MS

Here is a great new article sharing the wonderful ways Laughter Yoga can help people living with MS. A laughing matter about a serious subject The trial is the brainchild of lead investigator Dr. Ted Brown, director of neurorehabilitation at the EvergreenHealth Multiple Sclerosis Center in Washington state. “The goal of the study is to … Continue reading

Laugh Away Your Venous Ulcer

It seems the benefits of laughter has no end. Due to the movement of the diaphragm when we laugh heartily there is an increase in blood flow around the body – perfect for stimulating healing.  “It appears that laughter has other beneficial effects that could stimulate healing of venous ulcers and other types of chronic … Continue reading

How Laughter Can Help People with Multiple Sclerosis

“Researchers will look at depression, fatigue, and anxiety in the participants, as well as the perceptions their loved ones and caregivers have about these conditions.” The full article can be found here: http://www.healthline.com/health-news/laughter-can-help-wwith-multiple-sclerosis#1

The effect of laughter yoga exercises on anxiety and sleep quality in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease

An  interesting study on the benefits of Laughter Yoga for those living with Parkinsons disease. Among other activities which affect the quality of sleep in patients with Parkinson’s disease is respiratory disorder. One of the benefits of laughter yoga is, thus, improvement of the respiratory system. Laughter provides exercise to the lungs and chest muscles, … Continue reading

How Laughter Leads To Learning

This article discusses the use of humour in teaching and how the act of laughter produces great benefits to both student and teacher. If you consider that laughter is great at building relationships and bonding groups, promotes creativity and productivity and relieves stress as well as boosting the immune system you can see how bringing … Continue reading

Laughter In Infancy

A fascinating article by Gina Mireault, a professor of psychology at Johnson State College in Vermont about laughter in infancy. Did you know that babies who are deaf or blind laugh and smile at the same milestones as their peers? Amazing isn’t it? Here is an excerpt from the article but please take the time to read the … Continue reading

“Mirthful Laughter,” Coupled With Standard Diabetic Treatment, Raises Good Cholesterol And May Lower Heart Attack Risk

This is an interesting study in the American Physiological Society looking at how mirthful laughter affects diabetes, good cholesterol and heart attack risk.. The full research paper can be found here:http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/Archive/09/13.html “The study suggests that the addition of an adjunct therapeutic  mirthful laughter Rx (a potential modulator of positive mood state) to standard diabetes care … Continue reading

Benefits of Laughter Yoga for stroke patients

“With limited resources and challenges facing health practitioners working with stroke patients, more creative and innovative interventions are required. Although it is normally only considered cliché that “laughter is the best medicine,” specific medical theories and documented research attribute improved health and well-being to laughter. This study examined the biopsychosocial impact of laughter yoga and … Continue reading

Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold

” Abstract Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested … Continue reading